Reviews, profiles and news about music in Chicago

Preview: Sleep/Thalia Hall

Metal No Comments »

sleeppromo121-620x496RECOMMENDED

“Metal” is a very broad term, roping together a sweeping mass of bands that do not necessarily belong in the same genre. Sleep falls into this category, stoner metal specifically, but denies the stereotypes that make metal as a whole sound shallow. Their songs are essentially full albums with well thought-out compositions. Sleep knows how to find a hook and blow it up tenfold into long, massive songs that fade into each other and make longer, more narrative pieces. It’s difficult to find parallels between Sleep and certain godfathers of metal because they have moved beyond the blueprints set up for them. Sleep is evidence that metal has almost untraceably evolved since its beginnings.  Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Mike Reed’s People, Places & Things/Constellation

Chicago Artists, Jazz No Comments »

mikereedRECOMMENDED

If there is anyone whose musical direction should be trusted, it’s Mike Reed. As the director of the Pitchfork Music Festival and an important part of the Chicago Jazz Festival and the Umbrella Music Festival, Reed is well versed on Chicago jazz and beyond. His group, Mike Reed’s People, Places & Things, is a conglomerate of Chicago jazz and where it’s going. Free jazz can be difficult to follow for the casual listener, but Mike Reed’s People, Places, & Things is an approachable place to start.  Read the rest of this entry »

Swept-Up by the Songbook: Bobby Broom Brings the Past, Present

Chicago Artists, Interviews, Jazz No Comments »
Photo: John Broughton

Photo: John Broughton

By Corey Hall

Are y’all hip to “Sweet Georgia Brown”? According to the grapevine, “It’s been said/she knocks ‘em dead/when she lands in town/Since she came/why it’s a shame/how she cools them down!” Satchmo sang about her, as did Ella, Ray Charles and Jerry Lee Lewis. And now jazz guitarist Bobby Broom and his trio have made a play for the gray gal on “My Shining Hour,” his new album that will be released on August 19.

When talking to Newcity about this song, written in 1925, and recording—which he describes as a tribute to Americana—Broom notes that its ten songs have stayed relevant through many decades. “They’re classics, and they are cultural pieces, cultural history in music, at least from my perspective,” he says, in reference to the collection’s songs, which also includes “The Jitterbug Waltz,” “Tennessee Waltz,” and “Oh! Lady Be Good.”

When discussing “Sweet Georgia Brown,” Broom recalls a special moment 4:15 in from bassist Dennis Carroll. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: She Keeps Bees/Beat Kitchen

Indie Rock No Comments »

She-Keeps-Bees_Molly-Donahue13RECOMMENDED

When Jessica Larrabee and Andy LaPlant formed She Keeps Bees in 2006, LaPlant was banging a borrowed drum kit perched atop a stepladder to back Larrabee’s vocals. In those bedroom recording sessions, LaPlant also served as sound engineer on the pair’s sparse but powerful blues-tinted rock. So when they chose to work with a producer on their most recent record, “Eight Houses,” She Keeps Bees found themselves with a lot more input. Producer Nicolas Vernhes’ outside opinion “allowed us to really break down songs,” said Larrabee. “I think it stretched us.” Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: The Clean/Lincoln Hall

Indie Rock No Comments »

lnrrs1

RECOMMENDED

The Clean has been a highly influential band since the beginning.

They more or less personified the Dunedin Sound, a jangly, loose, lo-fi rock genre specific to their native New Zealand, on Flying Nun Records in the early eighties. This sound, propelled by university radio stations, eventually spread all over the world. Alt-indie staples like Sonic Youth, Pavement and Guided by Voices all cite The Clean in their influences. Moving forward, these bands that draw from The Clean serve as sources for countless other musicians. If you were to make a “Law and Order: SVU”-style string-web of where Pitchfork-centric bands come from, The Clean would be at or very near the middle. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Steely Dan/The Venue at Horseshoe Casino

Pop, Rock No Comments »

Steely DanRECOMMENDED

“Dad Rock” doesn’t feel like a compliment until the label’s slapped onto Steely Dan. When your adolescent flame flickers off as you get a real job, pay real rent and all, your brain becomes more rational. And it tells you this, in its new wisdom: you’ve been taking Steely Dan for granted, all along. Pops in his gaudy sweatpants shimmying along to their borderline-muzaky tones gave them a bad look, but only until you were smart enough to know what’s really cool. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Moonrise Nation/Lincoln Hall

Chicago Artists, Indie Rock No Comments »

groupwindowsfbcovercropRECOMMENDED

Moonrise Nation is one of those rare acts that is coming from a place of total honesty, presenting music that means a lot to them during the most important part of their development as artists. There is a certain misty wisdom in Moonrise Nation’s overall sound due to the songwriting itself as well as the general combination of piano, cello, guitar and woven harmonies. The group sounds like Regina Spektor collaborating with Atlas Sound, bringing together a darkened pop quirkiness and a mellow but fierce underlying force. Also, they’re all in their late teens, but this is not evident in their sound. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Helmet/Reggies Rock Club

Metal, Rock No Comments »

helmet_groupRECOMMENDED

Helmet’s seminal 1994 release “Betty” came during a time when rock was going through some weird shifts in the mainstream. Grunge was its nadir and the industry glommed onto so-called “alternative” or “post grunge” rock bands like Candlebox and Offspring to fill the void. So when “Betty” was released it made an impact, even though the album was not as much of a commercial success as Helmet’s sophomore effort, “Meantime.” Some music fans view “Betty” as their mainstream entry point into underground post-hardcore and metal while some critics see it as the accidental template for the rise of the much maligned sub-genre of nu-metal and representative bands like Slipknot and Limp Bizkit. Regardless of where one falls in the debate on the historical influence of “Betty,” the album stands up on its own. The meaty down-tuned riffs at the intro of “Milquetoast” or the pulverizing bass of “Biscuits for Smut” still manage to inspire mosh-pit action, even if said mosh pit is slower and much more cautious than in 1994. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Los Lonely Boys/Thalia Hall

Alt-Rock, Latin, Pop, Rock, Tejano, World Music No Comments »

loslonelyboys_photo1RECOMMENDED

As one of the few Latin-bred rock bands to make it into the mainstream rock scene, the three siblings of this power trio sure have made strides. On one of their first major tours, they teamed up with legendary Mexican-American band Los Lobos—with bassist Jojo Garza pulling double duty by performing in both bands, who would come together at the end of every set for an extended jam. Read the rest of this entry »

Time-Tested: Composer William Bolcom Returns to Grant Park with a new “Millennium”

Classical, Interviews No Comments »
Photo: Peter Smith

Photo: Peter Smith

By Dennis Polkow

The final week of the Grant Park Music Festival’s eightieth anniversary season will feature a residency with Pulitzer Prize-winning composer-in-residence William Bolcom, whose works will be spotlighted, including a world-premiere commission.

Bolcom, now seventy-six, is no stranger to Chicago and no stranger to the Grant Park Music Festival. In fact, it was a 1986 Grant Park performance of his mammoth “Songs of Innocence and Experience” that led to his being commissioned by Lyric Opera to write no less than three operas for the company.

Almost the moment Lyric’s then-general director Ardis Krainik thought of Lyric’s massive “Toward the 21st Century” initiative which would present one twentieth-century European and American opera each year leading to the new millennium, Bolcom was the first composer she thought of to write a brand new American opera. “After I heard ‘Songs of Innocence and Experience’ in Grant Park,” the late general director told me in 1992, “I was so moved, I went backstage and asked him on the spot.” Read the rest of this entry »