Reviews, profiles and news about music in Chicago

Raw Material: Never Mind CMJ, Get Your Buzz Right Here

Garage Rock, Krautrock, Psych pop, Punk, Singer-Songwriter No Comments »
Melkbelly

Melkbelly

Every year from late October to early November I suffer from a condition I call “CMJ Envy.” I spend all my time reading blogs and articles about the burgeoning bands and rising artists taking the stage at New York’s annual CMJ Music Marathon, and I wonder why Chicago can’t have similar events headlining new music. But in fact we do have something as cool; it happens every week in bars and small venues all across the city. But our regular music showcases don’t get nearly the attendance and press attention that big sexy events like CMJ get year after year. Part of that is on us, as live-music fans; we need to make the effort to show up and support local and touring bands before the critical buzz starts. With that in mind, here are some upcoming music events that are not only a good excuse to leave the house in the coming weeks, but also way more interesting than reading other people’s blog posts about the “next big thing.” Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Burger Records Caravan of Stars Tour/Logan Square Auditorium

Garage Rock, Punk No Comments »

burgerecords

RECOMMENDED

Burger Records has shaped the face of today’s growing garage and punk scenes while not overcapitalizing the bands it represents or cheapening the image it has largely created. The label was founded in Orange County in 2007 by Sean Bohrman and Lee Rickard of Thee Makeout Party. The label has had an insane seven years as a huge contributor of the increased popularity of cassette tapes and the epicenter of the garage sound that uses these tapes. At this point, though, they seem to be more of a driving force for the bands they represent to keep doing what they want than a controlling, stifling authority. “We’re just trying to nurture them [the bands], cater to all of them, and bring them together in one collective cooperative world where we can live happily and funnily,” Rickard told Vice magazine. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Dope Body/Township

Hardcore, Punk No Comments »

10532138_10152703463199791_3481776052060431079_o

RECOMMENDED

The first time I saw Dope Body was when they opened for Future Islands at Lincoln Hall in 2012 and I’ve been enamored with the band ever since. I’ll forget about them for a while, then one of their songs will come up when my iPod is on shuffle, and I am immediately transported back to the pure anarchistic joy I experienced listening to Rage Against the Machine for the first time in my older brother’s purple Mitsubishi Galant. Turn your nose up at Rage Against the Machine all you want, but I pity any reader that doesn’t know this feeling. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: King Tuff/Subterranean

Punk No Comments »

kingtuff

RECOMMENDED

King Tuff is touring to promote his new release “Black Moon Spell” on Sub Pop Records. This album is the ideal last fist-in-the-air for summer releases. It’s chock full of pump-up jams about LPs, sex, drugs, and embracing one’s own misfit status. This is the soundtrack to pre-gaming for a crazy night out in the kitchen with your best friends. Produced by Bobby Harlow, also known as the “Burger Guru,” a reference to the current Burger Records sound, and a huge player in the garage rock revival, “Black Moon Spell” is slightly lowbrow, but is such a fun listen and a solid release from beginning to end. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Agent Orange/Double Door

Punk No Comments »

agent orange-001

RECOMMENDED

Consider this a Riot Fest after-after-after show. These surf-punk veterans are more than thirty years deep in a pretty legendary career, playing music that today’s FIDLARS and Metz base their entire sounds on. Formed three years after and less than fifty miles away from the also legendary Black Flag, Agent Orange is less of a “punch everyone around you” kind of punk and more of a “shred the gnar” vibe, though I’m sure there’s some punching involved. Agent Orange is a band that any punk or garage fan loves, even if they’ve never intentionally listened to them. Read the rest of this entry »

Still Punk and political: A Conversation with Jake Burns of Stiff Little Fingers

Festivals, Punk No Comments »

stifflittlefingers
By Bart Lazar

Stiff Little Fingers is a punk band originally from Belfast, Ireland that has been around since the second  UK punk wave—they formed just six months after the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned.  Some of SLF’s best known work—”Tin Soldiers,” “Nobody’s Hero” and “Alternative Ulster”—-contains lyrics that hate hate:  advocating against war, violence, oppression, racial prejudice and class hatred.  Stiff Little Fingers’ influence lives on in more commercially successful descendants such as Green Day, The Offspring and Bad Religion.

Today, the band still exists with two of its four original members and recently released “No Going Back,” its first album in eleven years. The album just hit the charts in the UK at number fourteen, the band’s best performing material since the early eighties.

Jake Burns, the original snarling/shouting lead singer is now a Chicagoan–making the band twenty-five-percent local.  He discussed  the band’s history, relevance today and playing at Riot Fest in a recent interview.

How would you describe SLF to someone who is going to Riot Fest, and has never heard of you or your music?
We are a punk band that’s been doing it for thirty-seven years. We have always tried to play music that entertains, but means something in terms of social commentary.  Sometimes we are called a “Political” band, but I would say “political” with a small “p.” Certainly, we don’t play a lot of love songs.

Have the driving themes of your music changed over the years?
The themes we focus on—class distinctions, caring for one another, racism—are consistent. Those are the things that concern me most and those are the things that we can change. We can’t cure cancer. We live in America, where there are people sleeping in cardboard boxes. They are all things that offend my sense of justice. This is fixable!

Are you more optimistic about the world than you were back in 1978?
I don’t think so to be honest. People really are polarized. People that have things want to hold on to them.The “Greed is Good” mentality has come back again. That kind of selfishness is pretty dismaying.

You have seen touring bands that you influenced—Green Day, Offspring, Pennywise and Bad Religion. How does that feel?
It is very flattering. Green Day had us open their tour in Australia, and it was amazing to see them standing on the side of the stage watching our whole show. One of the guys from Pennywise told us he got his first fake ID so he could get into one of our shows. That’s some kind of influence.

What can old punks teach new generations?
When we started, the music was seen as outside of the mainstream, sort of “rebel” music, and we were not all about pleasing the public or selling anything.  Now punk rock, for better than not, has become part of the entertainment industry. And most “punk rockers” today are more about making party songs. At the end of the day, we are there to entertain people, we are not university lecturers—ultimately. But we can show people that the words are more important and older punks are not shy about saying things.

What can you say about the longevity of punk rock?
As the Clash said in “Complete Control” about what was said about punk and them—”They Ain’t Gonna Last.” One truism we’ve discovered is that it [punk] never goes away. Punk rock really does seem to be a life choice. It’s not just another t-shirt. You are buying a whole set of principles, and after you get past the outward appearances, I have found “punks” to be some of the most honest, gentle, solid, nice and polite people you will ever meet.

With a new record out, at Riotfest should we expect to hear the new album or your punk standards?
Riot Fest is one of the best festivals, and I am glad to play again before a hometown crowd. Because it is a festival it is more of a celebration, sets are shorter and although some may have come to see us, people are not necessarily coming only to hear us play and some may not even be aware of us at all—so it is not the platform to play the new record. We may play one new song, but we will focus on the Riot Fest theme and play more of our older material.

Stiff Little Fingers performs at Riot Fest in Humboldt Park and an aftershow with Cock Sparrer at Concord Hall at 9:30pm on Friday September 12.

Preview: Rise Against/Aragon

Chicago Artists, Punk No Comments »

Rise-Against

RECOMMENDED

Chicago punk stalwarts Rise Against are in celebratory mode, commemorating both the tenth anniversary of Riot Fest (they’re multi-year veterans) and their fifteenth year as a band. They’ve returned from a fairly lengthy break only to achieve an unlikely coup for a contemporary rock band. More than three years after the release of their last album, “Endgame,” the band’s most recent album “The Black Market” debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200. It’s little wonder after hearing the album’s first single “I Don’t Want To Be Here Anymore” a catchy and melodic hard-driver that definitely leans more heavily in the direction of the band’s poppier releases. “The Black Market” certainly doesn’t lack in the political screeds that Rise Against are well-known for, but it’s clear that the band’s more personal and introspective focus is in the forefront here. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Mannequin Men, Radar Eyes, Le Tour/Empty Bottle

Chicago Artists, Garage Rock, Psychedelic, Punk, Rock No Comments »

Mannequin-MenRECOMMENDED

I don’t know if you’re into garage, punk, psych or chasing whiskey with Schlitz (or not chasing it at all), but if you are into any of these, go to this show. Mannequin Men, Radar Eyes and Le Tour are some of the most compelling bands in Chicago right now and a show combining all of these forces should not be missed.

Mannequin Men have been playing together for about eleven years and consequently present an air of experience as well as general bliss on stage. Their sound is rough and upbeat; they kind of sound like the Black Lips’ tougher dads. Radar Eyes are lower key than Mannequin Men, mixing the beach vibes with grungy basement sounds. Le Tour is a furious force of pedals, screeches and ballsy guitar solos that, if you listen closely, are neatly constructed by somebody who really knows what they’re doing. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Brody Dalle/Bottom Lounge

Alt-Rock, Punk, Rock No Comments »

Brody DalleRECOMMENDED

Brody Dalle’s triumphant return to rock has been a long time coming. The former Distillers frontwoman has been in and out of the public eye for years with musical projects since the band’s 2006 break up, including Spinnerette, a one-shot collaboration with former bandmate Tony Bevilacqua and Alain Johannes (Queens of The Stone Age/Eleven). While the songs on “Spinnerette” boasted some catchy hooks, there wasn’t much that stood out about it either. But with her impressive solo release “Diploid Love,” we hear a musical range that hadn’t been fully explored in Dalle’s previous bands. Read the rest of this entry »

Fierce and Fed Up: Hardcore Punks Find A Home

Festivals, Hardcore, Punk No Comments »
Aye Nako photo by Robert Pluma

Aye Nako/Photo: Robert Pluma

Fed Up Fest, taking place July 25-27, is a new addition this year to the packed Chicago summer music festival scene. In the tradition of fests like Olympia, Washington’s Homo-a-go-go, Fed Up Fest seeks to highlight the contributions of LGBTQ musicians to DIY music, though where Homo-a-go-go covered a wide range of styles under the DIY umbrella, Fed Up Fest focuses on hardcore and punk. Conscious of the problem in LGBTQ spaces of the ‘silent T,’ where transgender community members get name-checked but can often be marginalized, the organizers of Fed Up Fest particularly wish to highlight bands from across the country featuring trans folks—especially trans women. Bands on this year’s lineup include: Read the rest of this entry »