Reviews, profiles and news about music in Chicago

Preview: Agent Orange/Double Door

Punk No Comments »

agent orange-001

RECOMMENDED

Consider this a Riot Fest after-after-after show. These surf-punk veterans are more than thirty years deep in a pretty legendary career, playing music that today’s FIDLARS and Metz base their entire sounds on. Formed three years after and less than fifty miles away from the also legendary Black Flag, Agent Orange is less of a “punch everyone around you” kind of punk and more of a “shred the gnar” vibe, though I’m sure there’s some punching involved. Agent Orange is a band that any punk or garage fan loves, even if they’ve never intentionally listened to them. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Christopher Owens/Park West

Singer-Songwriter No Comments »

christopher-owens-2-640

RECOMMENDED

Girls frontman Christopher Owens is releasing his second solo album, “A New Testament,” on September 29. A product of the Children of God cult, this graceful gender-bending San Francisco songwriter penned irresistible rock ‘n’ roll songs that moved between tender folk, hazy, thick guitar solos and peeping, unassuming vocals with Girls before releasing his first solo album, “Lysandre,” in 2013. “Lysandre” was a completely acoustic project that was hard to digest, but is full of beautiful songwriting and a universal narrative that is true to Owens’ form. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: The Raveonettes/Double Door

Indie Rock, Rock No Comments »

raveonetters

RECOMMENDED

Sounding a bit like their name, the Raveonettes channel a variety of influences from fifties groups the Shangri-Las and the Everly Brothers to hazy feedback noise like the Jesus and Mary Chain. This is not surprising in that the band is produced and managed by Richard Gottehrer—a seventy-four-year-old writer/producer/impresario who, among other things wrote “My Boyfriend’s Back” and produced Blondie, The Go-Go’s and The Dum Dum Girls. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Ty Segall/Thalia Hall

Alt-Rock, Rock 1 Comment »

TySegall

RECOMMENDED

California garage-rocker Ty Segall has been recording music at a manic pace ever since his debut in 2008, almost as frantically as he runs his fingers up and down the neck of his guitar. His latest record, “Manipulator” (Drag City), is something like his eleventh album, depending on how you count them. He reportedly spent more time than usual making this one, and it shows. Read the rest of this entry »

A Neighborhood Celebration of Sound: A Preview of the Englewood Jazz Festival

Chicago Artists, Festivals, Jazz No Comments »
Ernest Dawkins

Ernest Dawkins

By Corey Hall

For fifteen consecutive years, Englewood resident Ernest Dawkins has coordinated a free, six-hour outdoor celebration of sound as a contribution to his community. This celebration, officially called the Englewood Jazz Festival, is sponsored by the Live the Spirit Residency, a nonprofit organization Dawkins founded in 2006. He presented the first three Englewood Jazz Festivals through a grant from nonprofit Meet the Composer (now called New Music USA) and, when this grant ended, Dawkins supported the next three festivals with his own funds before establishing Live the Spirit.

“This community has multiple economic difficulties and has been ignored by the arts community for too long,” Dawkins said in a recent conversation. “I did this festival to try and institutionalize the music and arts in this underserved community and, in the future, I plan to branch out to Roseland or the West Side. I want this to get bigger.” Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Cymbals Eat Guitars/Schubas Tavern

Indie Rock, Rock No Comments »
photo: Eric White

Photo: Eric White

RECOMMENDED

“Lose,” the latest LP from Cymbals Eat Guitars—a band name culled from a Lou Reed quote describing the Velvet Underground’s blaring sound—begins with a carnivalesque run of keyboard notes and a reference to Klonopin taken to deal with relationship angst.

Singer Joseph D’Agostino carries a classic emo croon into territory more textural and measured than the genre his lilt suggests. The juxtaposition between CEG’s teensy energy and their adult knack for a barn-burning, shape-shifting, category-blurring number is what makes them compelling. D’Agostino screams primal things from each nook of the pristine, thoughtfully produced landscapes his band creates. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Shonen Knife/Bottom Lounge

Pop Punk No Comments »

shonenknife
RECOMMENDED

I do not think any band can put a smile on anyone’s face more than this Japanese power pop punk trio. Naoko Yamano and her bandmates have played rudimentary two-to-three-chord songs sung in rudimentary English. They’ve been going strong for more than thirty-two years and recently performed their 1,000th live show. While they may appear to be unassuming, don’t underestimate them; these ladies are simply exhilarating. We are talking about fast catchy riffs that engage, entertain and (make appropriate two-fisted hand gesture here) ROCK! Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Pomplamoose/Lincoln Hall

Pop No Comments »

pomplamoose

RECOMMENDED

San Francisco multi-instrumental duo Pomplamoose is an acquired taste, depending on your interest in adorable lo-fi jazz-pop. They’re best known for their YouTube series where they do inventive, split-screen covers and mashups of the latest pop hits (ex. Nicki Minaj’s “Superbass” and Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass”) and for their earworm holiday commercials for Hyundai back in 2010. Read the rest of this entry »

Record Review: “From Sassy to Divine: The Sarah Vaughan Project” by Ann Hampton Callaway

Chicago Artists, Jazz, Vocal Music No Comments »

callawaysassy300RECOMMENDED

On her live tribute to Sarah Vaughan recorded at New York’s Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, the Chicago-born singer, composer and arranger (known by the general public for the theme of the popular sitcom “The Nanny”) assembled a topnotch band formed by  Ted Rosenthal (piano), Dean Johnson (bass), Tim Horner (drums), Randy Sandke (trumpet and flugelhorn) and Dick Oatts (saxes and flute). The repertoire included tunes that Vaughan recorded throughout her long career.

The disc opens after a brief introduction with a lively rendition of Al Hoffman’s “I’m Gonna Live ‘Till I Die,” which features a lengthy, highly inspired solo from Sandke (incidentally, Hoffman was the composer of “Bear Down, Chicago Bears”). Steven Sondheim’s “Send In The Clowns” is played with great dramatic flair, a little reminiscent of Barbra Streisand’s version. Also notable are Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “Wave” performed in a downtempo bossa style and Adler/Rose “Whatever Lola Wants,” a sexy blues-tinged number that showcases the vocalist’s improvisations, while George Gershwin’s classic ballad “Someone To Watch Over Me” features its often-ignored introduction. Read the rest of this entry »

Orchestral Maneuvers: Riccardo Muti and the CSO’s New Season

Chicago Artists, Classical, Orchestral No Comments »
Photo: RiccardoMutiMusic.com

Photo: RiccardoMutiMusic.com

By Dennis Polkow

On the final day of his summer residency, a sunglasses-clad, informally dressed Riccardo Muti is standing in his hotel lobby texting on what he calls a “prehistoric” cell phone. “This is very old: Neanderthal man used this,” he says. “I received a smart phone from my children, but every time I touch it, it does different things and whatever I am doing, disappears. It was a disaster.”

As it turned out—but not revealed at the time—Muti had just met with Jeff Alexander, the man who would be named the new Chicago Symphony Orchestra president, and was in a very upbeat mood.

That Muti, who turned seventy-three in July and who is beginning his fifth season as music director—the last of his original contract—has signed a second five-year contract that will take his music directorship through 2020 is, of course, a huge coup for Chicago. “I have changed [the orchestra], but they have also changed me! We still have a lot to do. They have changed their spirit. It is so wonderful to go to a rehearsal so relaxed and happy.” Read the rest of this entry »