Reviews, profiles and news about music in Chicago

Less Successful Numbers: The Money of Local Music

Chicago Artists, News and Dish 3 Comments »
Illustration: Ray Noland

Illustration: Ray Noland

By David Safran

I am a solo artist who performs live music in Chicago. Urban Dictionary, the summit of our English language, has a few definitions of “solo artist.” The second is fitting: a musician who works on “material/songs in a primarily solo state.” But I prefer the first definition: solo artists are musicians so skilled at masturbation that “they take it to the level of an art.”

At any rate, I write songs and perform them live. I use my own name—a tricky sell in 2015—and I hire musicians to accompany me on stage. These musicians are professional and skilled—and expensive. It’s a costly process, taking on a show. Each musician gets about $100-$150 for the performance. I reimburse the band for travel expenses. Sometimes they request separate payment for rehearsals. I also rent space for our practices. If I perform one local show, I need at least $450 to break even.

Occasionally I get offers to open for touring solo artists. Over the past couple of years, talent buyers have contacted me about support slots not because the music matched or the headliners (and their agents) were David Safran fans, but because I could “add heft in ticket sales.” Those headliners—all global and careered and acclaimed—were, for whatever reason, having a tough time selling tickets here. Per-show booking fees for artists I’ve supported have all been in the thousands. My guarantees have been meager. For example, City Winery paid me $300. Lincoln Hall paid me $200. In October, SPACE offered me $100 with the expectation to bring the crowd; the headliner had only sold twenty-five tickets. SPACE is a music room in the back of a suburban pizzeria. You’d think its talent buyer, Jake Samuels, was booking La Scala. Yet I couldn’t get a guarantee higher than $100. I turned down his show offer. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Shabazz Palaces/Lincoln Hall

Hip-Hop No Comments »
Photo: Nikki Benson

Photo: Nikki Benson

RECOMMENDED

The glitchy, trippy music of Seattle-based duo Shabazz Palaces is hip-hop for sound and noise nerds, much more concerned with exploring different musical palettes and textures than creating beats to nod your head to. Ishmael Butler (formerly of Digable Planets) has a history of creating hip-hop with a solid foundation in jazz-influenced musicianship. With Shabazz Palaces, Butler goes even bolder and more experimental in his musical collaboration with multi-instrumentalist Tendai “Baba” Maraire. Together, they eschew sampling of existing songs and dare to create new patterns of melody and rhythm with drum machines, synth, samplers and various forms of percussive instruments. It’s hip-hop that tells a story through words and music and defies simple descriptions. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: The Clean/Lincoln Hall

Indie Rock No Comments »

lnrrs1

RECOMMENDED

The Clean has been a highly influential band since the beginning.

They more or less personified the Dunedin Sound, a jangly, loose, lo-fi rock genre specific to their native New Zealand, on Flying Nun Records in the early eighties. This sound, propelled by university radio stations, eventually spread all over the world. Alt-indie staples like Sonic Youth, Pavement and Guided by Voices all cite The Clean in their influences. Moving forward, these bands that draw from The Clean serve as sources for countless other musicians. If you were to make a “Law and Order: SVU”-style string-web of where Pitchfork-centric bands come from, The Clean would be at or very near the middle. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Moonrise Nation/Lincoln Hall

Chicago Artists, Indie Rock No Comments »

groupwindowsfbcovercropRECOMMENDED

Moonrise Nation is one of those rare acts that is coming from a place of total honesty, presenting music that means a lot to them during the most important part of their development as artists. There is a certain misty wisdom in Moonrise Nation’s overall sound due to the songwriting itself as well as the general combination of piano, cello, guitar and woven harmonies. The group sounds like Regina Spektor collaborating with Atlas Sound, bringing together a darkened pop quirkiness and a mellow but fierce underlying force. Also, they’re all in their late teens, but this is not evident in their sound. Read the rest of this entry »

The End of Journalism: New Ideas with Steve Albini

Chicago Artists, Interviews, Minimalism, Post-punk, Punk No Comments »
Steve Albini 1

Still from the documentary “Parallax Sounds”

By Kenneth Preski

Every critical outlet must justify its insights. The reasoning should extend beyond a simple citing of sources, should move past the seduction of poetic prose, and burrow down into the very tenets of knowledge that the writing seeks to embody. For a variety of equally abstract and profound reasons, this enterprise is in a badly confused state with respect to music journalism. What’s now required is a nuanced dialogue with musicians to re-appropriate the method, to re-envision the approach in favor of the artist and the audience. To that end, Steve Albini’s thoughts are invaluable. Beyond his work as a prolific sound engineer, Albini is a university-trained journalist and a seasoned musician. His band Shellac is on the eve of releasing “Dude Incredible” at a time when traditional operations for the music and publishing industries have been malformed by the internet. Now is the moment to re-strategize.

In an interview, it’s clear that the sea change has been on Albini’s mind. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Swans/Lincoln Hall

Experimental, Post-punk, Rock No Comments »

SwansRECOMMENDED

Legendary heavy experimental band Swans is headlining Lincoln Hall for what promises to be a terrifying and fascinating exposition of the adult haunted house that the band has been showcasing for the past thirty-two years. Their latest release “To Be Kind,” is their thirteenth studio album and is as intimidating as all of their releases in the past. The whole album, which is over two hours long, sounds like the soundtrack for a tour of a serial killer’s house. Swans has honed in on the aspects of doom and gloom that affect everyone, artfully crafting these elements together in a way that don’t give the listener even a hint of a break. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Atlas Sound/Lincoln Hall

Ambient, Drone, Electronic/Dance, Experimental, Folk-rock, Indie Rock, Rock No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

Photo: Sarah Cass

Photo: Sarah Cass

What will Bradford Cox do? This is one of my favorite questions. Known here on his idiosyncratic own as Atlas Sound, the Deerhunter frontman is compelling in ways we’ve long forgotten about in rock ‘n’ roll. Enigmatic, iconoclastic, angsty—Cox is a runaway train in every direction, performing himself against the world like music itself depended upon it. The warm ranges of his genre-roaming discography reflect this schizophrenia, and each Cox release (I sadly report that none accompanies this latest jaunt through Chicago) is an unpredictable new traipse along his singular path through guitar-related history. But what keeps the folks coming, and why this show comes recommended, is what Bradford is at bottom: a lost boy searching for meaning in sound, generously sharing what he’s found. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Angel Olsen/Lincoln Hall

Folk-rock, Indie Rock, Rock, Singer-Songwriter No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

Photo: Zia Anger

Photo: Zia Anger

Since the budding stages of her career, back when she used to play acoustic sets at quiet St. Louis coffeehouses as a teen, Angel Olsen has been most comfortable doing things by herself. Yet the addition of drummer Josh Jaeger and bassist/keyboardist Stewart Bronaugh to her latest LP “Burn Your Fire For No Witness” succeeds not only as a small triumph marking the formation of Olsen’s first-ever and very own band, but also as an amplifier for the trembling sense of nakedness usually drawn from the unsettling poetry of her lyrics.

Olsen’s sophomore album was released just a couple months ago. It is her first on the folk friendly label Jagjaguwar and follows her previous solo endeavors; an EP titled “Strange Cacti” (2011) recorded in a kitchen, and her debut studio album “Half Way Home” (2012), as well as several collaborative works. Much like the title suggests, “Burn Your Fire For No Witness” delves into themes of solitude and the void one feels and the questions one becomes acquainted with when love dies in a state of misunderstanding. Versed in a style that morphs between 1950s country and the dream-like stanzas of Leonard Cohen, Olsen sings with a range that crisscrosses from a delicate indie-fied Loretta Lynn to an indomitable PJ Harvey. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Cloud Nothings/Lincoln Hall

Indie Rock, Post-punk, Punk, Rock No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

Photo: Pooneh Ghana

Photo: Pooneh Ghana

For years now, Internet culture has spoiled rabid music fans with an overabundance of new releases. Listeners often seem to devour and then toss aside each new album in favor of the next big “Best New Music,” and punk trio Cloud Nothings could very well be the poster children of the movement. When the band’s fantastic 2012 release “Attack on Memory” hit virtual shelves, the Internet buzzed with excitement over what seemed like a hard-rocking debut. But the album was Cloud Nothings’ third, and you wouldn’t know it from listening. For the band’s first two albums, Cloud Nothings had been a well-received, homespun lo-fi pop solo project. Then lead man Dylan Baldi threw the whole formula out the window and charged onward, in classic Internet age fashion. In came a hard-hitting rhythm section, a much darker edge to the lyrics, and lots more screaming: punk outfit Cloud Nothings was born. Read the rest of this entry »

Audiovisual Ambition: A Guide to CIMMfest Success

Festivals No Comments »

By Kenneth Preskicimm-fest-2014-2

The marriage of movies and music is the twentieth century’s greatest gift to culture. With sight and sound no longer separate, the essence of two distinct art forms united to birth more cultural touchstones of artistic significance than any other technological advancement in the modern age. Films with an unmistakable soundtrack, or musicians with a strong visual presence—the list of seismic successes is too long and too obvious to print. The pairing is so crucial to culture that “audiovisual” has entered our lexicon. So listen up and picture this: when the Chicago International Movies and Music Festival (CIMMfest) inevitably succeeds at their quest to become the Midwest answer to South by Southwest, will the organizers be able to maintain the integrity accompanying independence, or will corporate sponsors weigh too heavily on the proceedings? CIMMfest isn’t big enough to have to bear that burden yet, but make no mistake: between all the films, concerts and panels to choose from, the festival’s sixth year may be the start of something much bigger. There are enough events happening to make creating a schedule for the long weekend a serious challenge. You might be here for work, or just committed to pleasure; whether you’re a tourist or a local, sticking to Milwaukee Avenue or exploring Chicago at large, CIMMfest has you covered. A festival pass will set you back $75, and guarantees you access to one headliner, three other CIMMfest sponsored events, and more than a hundred others on a first-come first-serve basis. There are endless possibilities. Here’s a suggested schedule to get you started: Read the rest of this entry »