Reviews, profiles and news about music in Chicago

Muti does Mahler, At Last: But Not for Long

Classical, Orchestral No Comments »
Gutav Mahler at the time of his First Symphony.

Gustav Mahler at the time of his First Symphony.

When the Chicago Symphony Orchestra commemorated Mahler’s death centennial three years ago, there were plenty of Mahler symphonies to be heard, to be sure. But curiously, none from its then-new music director, Riccardo Muti.

Instead, Muti chose to reconstruct the final concert that Mahler ever conducted a century before. “This was the last concert of Mahler’s life,” Muti told me at the time. “He went back to Vienna and died. As music director of the New York Philharmonic, he chose a complete program of music of Italian contemporary composers. He used the Mendelssohn ‘Italian’ Symphony because one of the composers didn’t write the piece that he asked for, but it was clear that he wanted to have a contemporary Italian evening. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Zakir Hussain and the Masters of Percussion/Symphony Center

Indian Classical No Comments »
Photo: Jim McGuire

Photo: Jim McGuire

RECOMMENDED

Son of tabla virtuoso Ustad Alla Rakha Khan, Zakir Hussain began life as a tabla prodigy in his native India, becoming a disciple of his legendary father before embarking on his own career at the age of twelve. His American debut saw him performing with Ravi Shankar.

In addition to his contributions to Indian classical music where he also vocalizes in the traditional manner, Hussain has long enjoyed cross-fertilizing Indian music with other genres, including Western classical music, jazz, rock, blues, Bollywood, et al. He co-founded the fusion group Shakti with guitarist John McLaughlin, the Grammy Award-winning “Planet Drum” and “Global Drum Project” with Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead and has performed and recorded with a wide diversity of artists across genres including George Harrison, Yo-Yo Ma, Van Morrison, Mark Morris, Christoph Eschenbach, Rennie Harris, the Kodo Drummers and Bela Fleck and Edgar Meyer, among others. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Riccardo Muti & the Chicago Symphony Orchestra/Spring Season

Classical, Orchestral No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

Riccardo Muti rehearsing Civic Orchestra, April 2013, Photo: Todd Rosenberg

Riccardo Muti rehearsing Civic Orchestra, April 2013, Photo: Todd Rosenberg

Riccardo Muti’s spring residency goes for two weeks this season, but what a jam-packed and extraordinary period of music-making it looks to be. This first week program includes pianist/conductor Mitsuko Uchida, who last week made her annual Chicago Symphony Orchestra appearance conducting from the piano. Not easy to conduct Robert Schumann from the piano, however, so Muti will be her collaborator for the Schumann Piano Concerto. The centerpiece of the program will be the Schubert “Great” Ninth Symphony, a work that Schumann championed posthumously after Schubert’s death at age thirty-one.

Muti’s idea of a day off that first weekend is to lead the Civic Orchestra, the training orchestra of the CSO that is marking its ninety-fifth anniversary this season, in an open rehearsal of movements from Prokofiev’s ballet suites for “Romeo and Juliet” on Sunday evening. This is a favorite piece of Muti’s and he has a lot to say about how various movements should sound, particularly as they relate to the emotions reflected in Shakespeare’s narrative. To watch him do so with an attentive audience of young musicians working to give him what he asks for is to experience a passing of the torch of the highest order. It also offers a rare opportunity to eavesdrop on the rehearsal techniques of one of the great conductors set to a basic level, a rare and wonderful deconstruction of the art of conducting. Tickets are free but must be ordered and demand is always high. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Murray Perahia Recital & Master Class/Northwestern University

Chamber Music, Classical No Comments »
Photo: Felix Broede

Photo: Felix Broede

RECOMMENDED

A Murray Perahia recital is a wonderful and increasingly rare thing to behold. Prior to his appearance in the fall of 2012 at Symphony Center, it had been several years since the celebrated pianist—a Chicago favorite during the Solti years because of his frequent collaborations with the late Chicago Symphony music director—had played here. Perahia had agreed to substitute for an ailing Maurizio Pollini in April of 2011, but Perahia himself ended up canceling, feeling that he had not sufficiently recovered from a hand injury that had sidelined him completely from a 2010 tour that was to have included Chicago.

This time around, Northwestern University’s Bienen School of Music is hosting Perahia, winner of the school’s biennial Lane Prize in Piano Performance, at its Evanston campus. One of the conditions of that prize and its $50,000 stipend is that the winner spend two to three non-consecutive weeks in residency at the Bienen School and engage in master classes, chamber music coaching and lectures. Read the rest of this entry »

Work in Progress: Muti Reveals the Once and Future Verdi, Step-by-Step

Chicago Artists, Classical, Orchestral, Vocal Music No Comments »
Chorus soloist rehearsal/Photo: Todd Rosenberg

Chorus soloist rehearsal/Photo: Todd Rosenberg

By Dennis Polkow

“Buon giorno,” says a sweater-clad Riccardo Muti, seated on his podium at an eerily empty Symphony Center, to a Chicago Symphony Orchestra clad in street clothes assembled for its first rehearsal of Verdi’s “Macbeth.”

“This is a great joy for me, since Verdi is the only composer that I can conduct,” Muti says, poking fun at his reputation as Verdi’s greatest living interpreter. The orchestra laughs.

“Seriously, you gave me the best ‘Otello’ I have ever done from an orchestral point of view,” Muti adds, referencing the 2011 Muti-led CSO performances of one of Verdi’s last operas that like “Macbeth,” is also based on Shakespeare and that has just been released on the CSO Resound label.

“You may think that because ‘Macbeth’ is earlier that it is less difficult music, but it’s not. This work was very ahead of its time. In fact, the operas to follow will be a step back.” Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Wynton Marsalis Quintet/Symphony Center

Jazz No Comments »

Photo: Clay Patrick McBride

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In the past few years, trumpeter and Jazz at Lincoln Center bandleader Wynton Marsalis has recorded three live albums of blues and soul music (two with Willie Nelson, one with Eric Clapton) in addition to touring with both his quintet and the JALC orchestra. He has also joined CBS News as a music correspondent, doing entertaining reports on Paul Simon, blues music and the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

His Chicago appearance with the quintet (which is rounded out by Walter Blanding on tenor sax, Dan Nimmer on piano, Carlos Henriquez on bass and Ali Jackson on drums) comes after a long European jaunt that included stops in France, Germany and England. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Paco de Lucia/Symphony Center

Flamenco, World Music No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

Some folks claim flamenco’s lineage reaches back several centuries. And that may well be the truth. The genre has its canonical figures, and Paco de Lucia is one of them. While the sixty-four-year-old ranks as the music’s best-known contemporary performer, he’s remained one of flamenco’s most explorative composers, conspiring with players engaged with jazz and other sympathetic genres. His ability to inject an adventurous tone into a music with such a long history, though, troubles some traditionalists. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: To Billie with Love: A Celebration of Lady Day/Symphony Center

Jazz No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

Though Billie Holiday died in 1959 pretty much in disgrace (she was technically under arrest as she lay dying in a New York hospital), her legacy as a jazz performer lives on thanks to countless reissues of her recordings and tributes from many contemporary jazz artists influenced by her work. Even though she has been gone for more than half a century, her unique delivery of tunes like “I’m a Fool to Want You,” “God Bless The Child” and “Lady Sings The Blues” are testament of the great talent taken away from us too soon. Incidentally, her recording of “I’m a Fool To Want You” was recently used as the backdrop for a Chanel commercial featuring French actress Audrey Tautou and Brazilian actor Rodrigo Santoro. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Roy Haynes/Symphony Center

Jazz No Comments »

RECOMMENDED

If drummer Roy Haynes isn’t an unsung hero of American jazz, a host of folks he recorded with are. Surely, doing time with players like Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins and Thelonious Monk means at least a little something to those not enamored of America’s most enduring art form. But moments from the work of other players serve to elucidate the hardscrabble path to creative freedom only a few folks achieved without becoming icons. Multi-instrumentalist Eric Dolphy embraced a more erratic and fractured style, but was able to create a unique dialect within the medium. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: John Scofield and Ravi Coltrane/Symphony Center

Jazz No Comments »

John Scofield

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Being a bit of everything hasn’t become a problem for John Scofield—it’s just a situation jazz guitarists find themselves in today. Coming along during the seventies, Scofield wound up working in a fusion mold, contributing to discs like flautist Jeremy Steig’s 1977 “Firefly.” After picking out the cheesier moments of the long-player, Scofield clearly becomes the most memorable and powerful player. Read the rest of this entry »